Alternatives to Medication, Strategies

Medication Alternatives for ADHD: Improving Your Brain

The more I research, the more evidence I find that you can have a real effect on any learning disability, attention deficit or other shortcoming of your brain. It’s not as easy as taking a pill. But it’s certainly achievable, and from what I gather, the changes are lasting or even permanent.

Hold on. If I have ADHD, the only treatment is drugs. Except diets, meditation, and yoga which don’t really do much. Right?

Not at all. In the past few decades, stunning advances have been made in Neuroplasticity: the brain’s ability to drastically change with the right training.

What does this mean? It means that eventually, things like ADHD and other cognitive quirks won’t be “problems” anymore. (I for one believe ADHD is an asset in many ways, but that’s another discussion.)

So what is the “right” training? Here are a some resources that have reported success improving the brain permanently.

The Brain That Changes Itself tells amazing success stories of neuroplasticity, such as the curing of learning disabilities; stroke victims who make full recoveries; use of technology to help amputees with Phantom Limb Syndrome and vestibular dysfunction.

The Arrowsmith School has been developing learning disabilities for decades using regimens of intense cognitive exercises. The founder, Barbara Arrowsmith-Young was severely learning disabled, and after correcting her own deficits started the school.

Neurofeedback has been reputed to be effective in improving ADHD and learning disabilities. In New York, The Brain Clinic has reportedly gotten some ADHD people completely off their medication since their deficits have no longer been a problem. Here’s an anecdotal video on neurofeedback for ADHD.

Many of the above treatments claim to be highly effective but are expensive. I’ve been obsessed with Lumosity since it’s a cheap do-it-yourself brain entrainment solution. I do the brain games almost every day, and within less than a month I started to see gradual improvement of my working memory, concentration and attention.

2 Comments

  1. mike carlson

    I was wondering if things that train the prefrontal cortex diminish creativity in people with ADHD

    Reply
    • admin

      Hi Mike, definitely do some research to get more evidence than my thoughts, but I don’t believe that they do. My sense is that training your brain’s ability to focus will give you more control over your attention. You can still daydream, visualize and be creative – only with better control of it.

      Reply

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